Home > Chinese, HK: Tsim Sha Tsui, HK: Wanchai, Hong Kong, Hot Pot > Hot pot, hot pot and MORE HOT POT……

Hot pot, hot pot and MORE HOT POT……

Hot pot, also commonly known as steamboat or shabu shabu, is usually consumed in the winter. A simmering metal pot of stock is placed at the center of the dining table, and whilst the hot pot is kept simmering, ingredients are placed into the pot and are cooked at the table. Because hot pot styles are different from region to region, many different ingredients are used. However, the main ingredients are thinly sliced of meat, leafy vegetables, mushrooms, wontons, dumplings and seafood.

I have never really eaten hot pot in summer, because of the heat, however, this summer in Hong Kong, I have been to three different hot pot places and have enjoyed every single one of them. The main difference in the three different hot pot places is the soup base and ambiance. The types of ingredients are pretty much the same, but pending on who you go with, they will order different things.

Little Sheep:

Little Sheep is a chain of Mongolian Hot Pot restaurants, whereby you choose the soup base: spicy, non-spicy or a bowl split down the middle with half spicy and half not. We opted for the half and half. We also opted for the all you can eat buffet, which included all you can drink (non alcoholic) and a few beers.

I was told that the soup uses meat broth and is loaded with different types of “Chinese medical restorative materials” which was full of flavour. The spicy soup, is similar to that of the non-spicy, the main difference are chilies and chili oil. It was incredibly spicy, so for those who do not have a reasonably high tolerance for chili, do not cook your food here. I would suggest you let it simmer in the non-spicy soup, and then ‘dunk’ it in the spicy soup to get that spicy flavour. The spicy soup was seriously spicy!

As you can see from below (and above), we ordered HEAPS of food! Different types of wontons, balls, beef, pork, lamb, vegetables, mushrooms, and tofu. I have to say, the beef and wontons were outstanding and were my favourite. The lamb was my least favourite, but that’s because I am not a lamb fan!

One thing I love about hot pot is the social aspect of it. A group of friends, sitting around this ‘pot’, chatting, whilst cooking and eating. It’s very enjoyable and satisfying.

Please note: your clothes tend to absorb the cooking smells so don’t get too dressed up.

Megan’s Kitchen:

The interesting thing about hot pot at Megan’s Kitchen is the soup and its presentation. We ordered two different types of soup. The first soup looked like an over sized cappuccino, frothy with chocolate sprinkles on top. The soup base was tom yum like, spicy and sour with chicken flavour.

The second soup was soufflé like but it was tomato and crab soup base with a soufflé finish. I thought the tomato and crab soup was a little bland for my liking. I preferred the first soup, which was closer to me!

Megan’s Kitchen is not all you can eat, however, we did manage to order a lot of food (no surprises here!), ranging from beef (the Japanese beef was SOOOO GOOD!), wontons, pork, lamb, different types of balls, vegetables and tofu.

I enjoyed the soup here at Megan’s Kitchen, the presentation was different to that I have seen. It was deliciously good.

Our friend, J, managed to get us a private room, I am not sure how she did it, but it was superb. It wasn’t noisy and we got to talk / laugh as loud as we wanted (not that we would tone it down if we were outside but it was more enjoyable).

Sichuan Hot Chili Oil Chinese Restaurant:

Again with this restaurant, we ordered the half and half. Half non-spicy and half spicy! The spicy soup reminded me a little bit like Little Sheep, incredible spicy and full of flavour. The non-spicy soup was a little bland I have to admit, I thought it would be rather sweet with all the apples and tomatoes floating around, alas, I was wrong.

We ordered a LOT of food also, however, my favourite dish, is their crispy chicken with lots and lots of chilies. The chicken was crispy and crunchy, albeit tiny but the mountain of red pepper was incredibly spicy and flavourful. The red pepper left a tingle on my tongue and made my mouth numb! To add to this delicious dish was cashew nuts, crispy, spicy and fried, it was amazing. The combination of it all was just mouth watering. My only gripe would be, there weren’t enough chicken!!!!!!

The bunsen burner in this restaurant was not embedded in the table (we were seated on the top floor, the tables below had the bunsen burner embedded in the table), which was a tad annoying as you had to stand up to reach for your food. A minor detail, but I found that it was just easier to reach and cook for food if the bunsen burner is embedded in the table.

Overall: I enjoyed little sheep best. Megan’s Kitchen and the Sichuan Hot Chili Oil Chinese Restaurant came close, although I was intrigued by Megan’s Kitchen soup finish i.e. the cappuccino and soufflé finish.

I loved the Japanese beef at Megan’s Kitchen, it was a little on the pricey side but it was definitely worth every single penny.

All the ingredients were fresh, and tasty. I believe it is all about the soup and the ambience of the restaurant.

It’s definitely a great way to eat with friends and family!

Little Sheep: GA’s rating: 7.5 / 10

1- 4/F, 16 Argyle Street

MongKok, Hong Kong

Ph: +852 2396 8816

Megan’s Kitchen: GA’s Rating: 7 / 10

5/F, Lucky Centre, 164 – 171 Wanchai Road

Wanchai, Hong Kong

Ph: +852 2866 8305

Sichuan Hot Chili Oil Chinese Restaurant: GA’s Rating: 7 / 10

1&2/F, No. 27 Gravanille Road

Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong

Ph: +852 2312 0823

2866 8305

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