Home > Japan, Japanese, Jpn: Tokyo, Travelling > Tokyo Eateries, Part 2..

Tokyo Eateries, Part 2..

More on the Tokyo eateries…..

7. Genpin Fugu, Shinjuku

One thing I wanted to eat in Japan was FUGU! Also known as puffer fish, it can be lethally poisonous due to its tetrodotoxin, a poison that is 1200 times more lethal than cyanide. It only takes a small amount to kill a person and each blow fish contains enough to kill 30 people, therefore has to be carefully prepared. I am not quite sure what my obsession with fugu is but I HAD to try it. Not sure if it’s trying to live dangerously or the simpsons episode but I was determined to eat it.

Genpin Fugu is a restaurant that serves fugu and nothing else. There are many branches; however, ‘The Mother’ and I went to the one in Shinjuku. Upon entering the restaurant, there is a fish tank where your meal is still swimming around in it. It is one of the ugliest fish I have ever seen!

‘The Mother’ and I opted for one set course (they are really into their set courses!) plus another serving of hot pot.

We started with the ‘Yubiki’ – boiled chopped skin served with sauce which was AMAZING! The sauce consisted of soy sauce, shallots, garlic and onions. The fugu was fresh, it was a little chewy but eaten with the sauce was quite tasty.

Next the fugu sashimi. The sashimi itself was a little dull and tasteless, it has a similar texture to yellow tail but it has a really interesting effect of numbing your mouth after a few bites. Dipped in sauce, it gave it more flavouring and taste. Surprisingly, both ‘The Mother’ and I really enjoyed it.

The fugu hot pot – now this was incredible and you have to see it to believe it. Cooked on the table in the most amazing pots, it’s a basket with a piece of paper lining – yes just a paper lining! You then cook everything in there – I was amazed and I kept wondering how this paper didn’t rip or whiltered?

The sauce – I LOVED! One of the best I have ever eaten.

The different cuts of fugu – ready to be boiled and eaten.

Cooking the fugu and vegetables.

The boiled fugu was wonderful, it was still a tad chewy and tasteless but again with the sauce was excellent.

The ‘Zousui’ – porridge of rice and egg yolks cooked with the broth and as horrible as it looks, it was actually quite tasty. Similar to that of porridge, it was moist and more watery than porridge or congee. ‘The Mother’ had about three bowls, he definitely enjoyed it.

Lastly, dessert, a scoop of macadamia ice cream, it was creamy with big chunks of macadamia and was the perfect way to end the meal.

I really wanted to try the ‘torafugu karaage’ – deep fried fugu, but ‘The Mother’ was full and well I doubt I could have eaten the whole thing on my own.

Everything was fresh, I have heard that this delicacy can get really expensive. One set meal and an extra hot pot costs about (5900 yen, which is about AUD 72).

We both survived it, so if you feel like you want to live dangerously for a night and want to try something different, go for it, try the fugu!

GA’s ratings: 7.5 / 10

‘The Mother’s’ ratings: 7.5 / 10

Genpin Fugu

2F, 3-8-2 Shinjuku,

Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo

Ph: +81 3 3341 9529

6. Soba and Tempura, Akasuka

‘The Mother’ and I were meeting some friends for lunch who has recently moved to Tokyo for work – LUCKY SOD! So jealous! ‘The Mother’ worked with H and luckily for him, got a transfer to Tokyo to work.

Unfortunately S, H’s beautiful wife, couldn’t be there as she had a big night the night before and was not feeling too great. S had picked this wonderful all you can eat restaurant, she loves food just as much as I do, however, H could not find it, so we went to the first restaurant that we saw which was this soba house, call Tanakaya.

Soba is a thin buckwheat noodles which can be eaten either hot or cold and are great all year long.

‘The Mother’, H and I all opted for the tempura, soba lunch set, except H opted for the cold soba. Prepared in a different way to that of pasta, most Japanese noodles, including soba are rinsed vigorously in cold running water to get rid of excess starch. The cold soba was served on a sieve-like bamboo tray called a zaru with dipping sauce known as soba tsuyu on the side. The tsuyu is made of a strong mixture of dashi, sweetened soy sauce and mirin.

It was a cold day and I couldn’t bear the thought of eating cold soba, so opted for the hot soba. It was served in a bowl of hot tsuyu, which is thinner than that used as a dipping sauce for chilled soba. The soba was cooked to perfection and delicious, I couldn’t help but keep slurping the soba – it was good.

The tempura, was served on a bowl of rice, prawns, fish, eggplant and pumpkin – it was wonderful and a great complement to the soba. The rice was a little too much for my liking!

It was great catching up with H, I am a little jealous of his new venture in Tokyo! It was an enjoyable meal, and reasonably cheap too, about 1400 yen (AUD 20).

GA’s ratings: 7.5 / 10

‘The Mother’s’ ratings: 8 / 10

Soba Tanakaya – www.soba-tanakaya.com

5. Gonpachi, Roppongo Hills

If you have watched kill bill, then you will recognise the battle scene – it is one that is not forgotten easily. Uma Thurman in her yellow jumpsuit with her big samurai sword being all scary and well quite impressive in my opinion. This restaurant can be found near Roppongo hills in Tokyo.

I have heard about this restaurant from various friends, and was keen to check it out (and because I am a Kill Bill fan!). Upon entering, we were greeted by all the staff who loudly shout their welcomes in unison. We didn’t have a reservation but were offered a table by the bar which suited us fine.

‘The Mother’ didn’t want the set menu – too much food he claims so we opted for a la carte. We started with the grilled miso glazed back cod and it was as delicious as it looked! It was served with a mound of grated daikon. The cod was wonderfully cooked, the skin was caramelised and sticky and the miso marinade was delightfully sweet. A great start!

‘The Mother’ and I were highly impressed with the kakuni stewed pork belly with radish served with half a boiled egg. The pork belly was so tender it just fell apart. It was brilliant, we couldn’t help but fight for every single last piece.

The japanese wagyu beef steak was to die for. Served medium rare, the beef just melted in the mouth, no chewing required and the grated daikon was a great complement. This was definitely a winner for me.

The charred grilled eggplant with chicken miso sauce and cheese was delicious. Soft tender eggplant baked with miso and sprinkled over cheese – it was gooey and cheesy. ‘The Mother’ didn’t want any of this, so yes, I ate the whole thing myself! Appalled? I was!

‘The Mother’ opted for the kake soba – plain noodels served in hot broth. It was plain but ‘The Mother’ certainly enjoyed it.

They do have set meals if you don’t want to pick and choose. The restaurant is simple but wonderfully decorated. I love the lanterns hanging from the ceiling. The waitress were attentive and service excellent. It was a fun and buzzing restaurant  at affordable prices. I would definitely recommend Gonpachi, even if its just for lunch and to check out the fighting scene!

GA’s ratings: 8 / 10

‘The Mother’s’ ratings: 7.5 / 10

Gonpachi

1F,2F, 1-13-11 Nishiazabu,

Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0031

Ph: +81 3 5771 0170

Hope you have all enjoyed part two of Tokyo Eateries. Last post of Tokyo eateries to come shortly.

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  1. February 9, 2011 at 9:47 am

    omg!! all of them looks so delicious and gosh i want to try fugu as well! great post and info about japan eateries. great guide!

    • February 9, 2011 at 12:29 pm

      hey mel – it was really good! you should definitely try fugu… interesting to say the least 🙂 thanks!

  2. Kevin
    February 9, 2011 at 9:52 am

    Damn!! We stayed in Shibuya didn’t think about going there…

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